Category Archives: Auto & Entertainment

Understanding Foreign Brands – What’s the meaning of “KIA”?

150121-kia-fnt

Understanding Foreign Brands – What’s the meaning of “KIA”?

When you hear the word KIA, what’s the first thing that comes to mind? It is IKEA (the Swedish furniture company)? Is it tennis? Super Bowl commercials? What about affordable cars with good quality? Or the image of an Asian automotive company? Or even perhaps the name Peter Schreyer — the world famous car designer? For all practical reasons, the answer could be all of above.

But now, what’s the meaning of KIA in the first place? Is it an abbreviation of the Korean Industry Association? Or does it mean, something else, like the “Korean Inventors of Asia”? Well, before we get to the answer and if you care to know, we’ll need to investigate and decipher its original meaning by taking into account the following three-step language layer(s) which involve English, Korean and Chinese characters.

kia-기아-3

Now, if we take a closer look at the above, the name KIA is derived from the Korean pronunciation of two Chinese characters — (1) “起” and (2) “亚” — which have the following meaning(s).

  • “起” can take on several meanings, but in this context (a Korean’s context), it typically means to “awake” as in 起床 (get-up out of bed, or to wake-up) or “rise-up (stand)” as in the word 起立拍手 (기립박수 – a standing ovation).
  • “亚 (亞)” is easier because it phonetically represents the first syllable in Asia (亞細亞).

Thus, if we combine (1) and (2) together, a new meaning appears which means “Rise (or rising) in Asia” which also conveys a secondary meaning which is “Visible in Asia” because if you stand-up, you also become visible at the same time. Well, there you have it. Now you know — this is the meaning of KIA.

150121-kia-long-02

 *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

Note: According to the English version of Wikipedia, it is mentioned that “ki” in KIA stands for “to come out”. However, in reality (the use of Chinese characters), “ki” (起) represents more than just one meaning. For instance, if one uses Google Translate, “ki” gives out the following eight definitions (i) start or begin, (ii) build, (iii) extract or pull, (iv) get-up or rise, (v) grow or raise, (vi) set-up, (vii) unship and finally (viii) work out. The Korean language has adopted and applied this Chinese character — “ki” (起) — to usually (99.9% of the time) mean only (iv) get-up or rise, and not the other seven meanings in the dictionary. Thus, a person from China who doesn’t have any knowledge over how Chinese characters are used within the Korean language may give you a different answer to the meaning of KIA. If you have a different interpretation, please feel more than welcome to leave a comment (provide insight) in our discussion box below.

  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

MY TAKE ON THIS STORYCLICK BELOW TO VOTE
Informative Interesting Uplifting Unbelievable Like Dislike
Proudly powered by WordPress

Sunlight Whispering on Cobblestone Walls (Photo Gallery)

by

EVP & Partner, Stanton Chase Korea

141015-photo-bgkim-03autumn-front

Sunlight Whispering on Cobblestone Walls (Photo Gallery)

Like the sunlight that whispers on top of cobblestone walls, in resemblance of spring-water that smiles beneath the grass, my heart longs to gaze quietly up at the sky all day long on a splendid spring road.

Like the shyness which appears on the cheeks of innocent children, in resemblance of water ripples that mildly soaks into a poem’s core, my heart longs to gaze up at the silken sky as it flows forever thin with tender emerald hue.


Note: The above is a Korean poem translated into English … Title: “Sunlight Whispering on Cobblestone Walls (1935)” by Yeong-Rang (a.k.a. KIM, Yun-Sik) … paired up with a recent set of photographs below (“Hanok & Autumn”) taken by Brian J.G. Kim.


141015-photo-bgkim-03autumn01

*  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

141015-photo-bgkim-03autumn02

*  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

141015-photo-bgkim-03autumn03

*  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

141015-photo-bgkim-03autumn04

*  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

141015-photo-bgkim-03autumn05

*  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

141015-photo-bgkim-03autumn06

 *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

141015-photo-bgkim-03autumn07

*  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

141015-photo-bgkim-03autumn08

*  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

141015-photo-bgkim-03autumn09

*  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

141015-photo-bgkim-03autumn10

 *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

141015-photo-bgkim-03autumn11

 *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

141015-photo-bgkim-03autumn12

*  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

MY TAKE ON THIS STORYCLICK BELOW TO VOTE
Informative Interesting Uplifting Unbelievable Like Dislike
Proudly powered by WordPress

A Taste of K-POP: “There’ll never be someone like that person again” from the Korean Movie “More than Blue” OST

140802mrethable04

A Taste of K-POP: “There’ll never be someone like that person again” from the Korean Movie “More than Blue” OST

With more than 5.97 million views on YouTube, the title of this is song is translated into English as “There’ll never be someone like that (special) person again“ comes from the OST (Original Sound Track) of the movie “More than Blue” which was first released in 2009. The movie’s Korean title is translated into “A Story Sadder than Sadness.”

The artist singing this ballad is LEE (family name), Seung-Chul — also spelt as LEE, Seung-Cheol. He is known is Japan as RUI. He is a former vocalist of a famous local rock band called Boowhal.

The lyrics of the song start off by saying that it would be impossible to meet somebody like that person, even if one were to be (re)born one-thousand times. In other words, during the span of one thousand straight lifetimes. That thankful person made my terribly cold life so warm.

The movie is a love story which is sprung between K (played by Kwon, Sang-Woo) and Cream (played by Lee, Bo-Young) who both grew up as orphans. K was abandoned by his mother, and Cream lost her entire family in an auto accident. More than Blue depicts, in its own way, how men (K) and woman (Cream) in life can view, experience and interpret the exact same event in different ways.

This movie can be viewed on “Nexflix” , “IMDb” and “Watch32.com” and is available on YouTube with English, Spanish, Arabic, Vietnamese, French and Chinese subtitled versions.

♦ Food for Thought 

With today’s rapid increase in international marriages, the subject of communication is also becoming very important every day. This movie, by going back to past events and showing the inner emotions and self-dialog — over the same chain of events — and when K and Cream are not together shows how often communication, and holding back, can be difficult even between people who speak the same language. Could it be that catching what is not said is also an important communication skill in all languages?

♦ Language Footnote 

  • (Song) There’ll never be someone like that again // 그런 사람 또 없습니다
  • (Movie) A Story Sadder than Sadness // 슬픔보다 더슬픈 이야기
  • (Artist) Lee, Seung-Cheol // 이승철 (李承哲)
  • The song with Korean Lyrics (written in Korean) //  가사 (歌詞) // Click HERE

♦ Related Outside Stories and External Links via the World Wide Web ♦

No. Title Language
(Sub-Title)
Views Uploaded
Date
Name
1. TRISTE HISTORIA DE AMOR Spanish 1,462,957 19-Dec-10 uzikasia
2. More than blue 1/10 (eng) English 288,239 09-Feb-09 nickasheen daluz
3. More Than Blue… Spanish 242,378 23-Sep-12 pulgararribabrother
4. More Than Blue / A Sad Story More Than Sadness (Part 1) Vietnamese 59,154 10-Feb-12 Keith Trần
5. More Than Blue Japanese 46,250 06-Dec-09 ikemenkorea2010
6. 比悲傷更悲傷的故事 Chinese 18,278 23-Oct-13 Grave Wong
7. More Than Blue 1-2 HD Arabic 16,547 17-Mar-13 Rawa Khalid
8. A Story Sadder than Sadness English 14,301 03-Dec-13 MsLena
9. More Than Blue (2009) French 5,612 02-Jan-14 Arifajiji poonka
10. More Than Blue Thai 3,250 14-Sep-10 jiraroot

♦ More information from YouTube 

Note: The Seoul Tribune takes "copyright and fair use" seriously. However, and as the internet continues on with its evolution, there remain quite a few number of “grey” areas still left open to legal interpretation and/or the Republic of Korea court decision cases. If you notice any violation(s) for attention, please send us a message by using this “Contact Us (click here)” form with your opinion so that we may promptly address your concern(s).
MY TAKE ON THIS STORYCLICK BELOW TO VOTE
Informative Interesting Uplifting Unbelievable Like Dislike
Proudly powered by WordPress

Take a ride in a “Best Driver” Taxi

14-07-19 txi 01

Take a ride in a “Best Driver” Taxi

Taking a cab in country where you don’t speak the local language can be, at first, both a frightening and frustrating experience. This is usually because of a combination of factors such as (a) difficult communication, (b) different type of taxis, and (c) not familiar streets.

Here’s an overview — the ins and outs, if you will — of the taxi system in Seoul, South Korea to help you move around town when you visit dynamic Seoul.

First before we get started, let’s imagine a hypothetical scenario where you’re trying to catch a cab in Seoul, and you (just about now) want to ask someone how to grab a “taxi.”

This sounds quite simple and straight forward, but the way people (Koreans) pronounced taxi is not “Tax+E” (as in Taxation +Easy), so people may not understand your pronunciation of taxi at first.

If this is the case, the reason is because “Taxi” in Korean is pronounced as “Tech+She” or better yet “Teck+She” (as in “heck” – but with a “T” rather than “H”; and then “She”). Thus, try saying “Teck-She” and people will understand you better. To explain a bit further, and in Korean, “Taxi” is translated into, spelt and read as, “택시” which is “Teck-She” – so, more people are familiar with the tone (sounds) of Teck-She as opposed to Tax-E.

♦ Value-Added Insight ♦

From a fare perspective, Seoul has mainly 2 different types of cabs (taxis). One is the “Deluxe Taxi” and the other is a non-Deluxe (or “Regular”) Taxi.

The fare of a “Deluxe Taxi” is much more expensive than a “Regular” Taxi. For instance, and currently during July 2014, the beginning fare for a “Deluxe” taxi is 5,000 KRW (about $5.00 USD) for the first 3 km (kilometer) where as for a “Regular” taxi the beginning fare is 3,000 KRW (about $3.00 USD) for the first 2 km (kilometers).

The meter on the cab, thereafter, runs (goes up) on a combination of distance and time. The meter for the “Deluxe Taxi” goes up by an increment of 200 KRW (20 cents) whereas the “Regular Taxi” meter will go up by 100 KRW (10 cents).

A Late night surcharge (20%) is automatically added, if you ride between midnight and 4:00 am. If you ride outside of Seoul (out-of-town) during late-night hours, another 20% is added. Thus, there is a 40% surcharge.

14-07-19 txi 02

As seen above, and because all Deluxe Taxis are of color “black” – these cabs are sometimes referred to as “black cabs” if you begin to use street talk.

The “non-Black” cabs — either silver or orange — in Seoul are the “Regular” cabs; and there a two fundamentally different types of “Regular” cabs, which is important to remember because of same-price, but quality differences.

Specifically, (1) one-type is privately owned and operated by an “Individual Owner” and these cabs are called “Individually Owned” Taxis; and (2) second-type of a “Regular” class cab is the “Company Operated” Taxis.

14-07-19 txi 04

14-07-19 txi 05

The “Company Operated” cabs in Seoul take on the color “orange” but there are still a good number of old “silver” and/or “white” cabs on the road which are also “Company Operated” which are planned to be phased out – these cabs have a “Blue” crown (night-light-box) on top of the roof of the car.

14-07-19 txi 06

Although the fare is exactly the same, the level of service your get from an “Individually Owned” cab is at least 2-3 times better than if you would ride a “Company Operated” taxi because of the following reasons.

Ownership: The driver for an “Individually Owned” taxi is actually driving his own vehicle, whereas behind the handle of a “Company Operated” taxi is an employee who is driving a car provided to him (her) by the cab company. Ownership of the cab makes a big difference in the “service” mind-set of the driver. If we look at the “Individually (or Driver) owned” taxi, the driver has already invested in purchasing the cab, and typically considers driving his (her) life-time vocation. Thus, these people are more professional. On the other hand, and if we look at the drivers who are working for a “Company Operated” taxi company; their primary interest is to get a paycheck at the end of the day. In other words, they are not so much concerned about the provision of good quality service.

Experience & Safety:  In order qualify to become an “Individually Owned” taxi driver; one must have a driving record of having “no accidents” for at least 3 years. In the past, the requirements to become an “Individually Owned” cab driver were much higher. The “Company Operated” cab company will basically hire anyone who has a driver’s license. Thus, statistically, the “Individually Owned” taxis are less likely to get involved in an auto-accident.

14-07-19 txi 07

Best Driver: Another sub-class of the regular fare “Individually Owned” taxi is the “Best Driver” class. This is, by far, the best “bang-for-the-buck” cab in Seoul. The drivers behind the handle of these cabs are the same, if not better, than the “Deluxe Taxi” class. In order to quality to have this “crown” on top of your cab, the driver must have had no accident for at least 15 years. Thus, if and when you choose to ride in this type of cab, you could be easily surprised with good service and peace-of-mind.

14-07-19 txi 08

In addition to its distinctive crown on the roof of the car, the “Best Driver” Individually Owned Regular Taxi also has 90% percent of the time an emblem on its front door.

14-07-19 txi 09

If we go back to talking about the “Deluxe Taxi” class, it is worth noting that any black color cab (“Deluxe Taxi’) — whether it’s a sedan, limo, foreign SUV and/or large vans (called “Jumbo Taxi”) — will charge at the same (equal) premium rate. Thus, if you are able to spot a stretched limo, and you’ve decided to go premium (deluxe), then the meter for the limo will also start at 5,000 KRW. In other words, “black cabs” all go by the same fare-rate basis.

14-07-19 txi 10

♦ Food for Thought ♦

If there are many cabs waiting in line, the best way to distinguish taxis in Seoul are by looking at the “crown” that’s located on top of the roof of the vehicle. Here’s a quick guide and summary:

14-07-19 txi 11

Should you prefer luxury and/or are a business class traveler, then the “Deluxe Taxi” (black cab) with “Yellow” crown is recommended. You will, however, pay a higher price. These cabs are typically parked in front of 5 start hotels or near bars, restaurants and/or nightclubs in the upscale Gangnam district, for example.

If you wish best value, then choose the Regular Fare “Individually Owned (Best Driver) Taxi” for transportation. If you don’t see one of them (none available) in line, then the “Individually Owned (silver cab)” with either a “yellow” or “white” crown is good.

The Regular Fare “Company Operated” taxis are either color Orange, or have a “Blue” color crown. Avoid taking these cabs, if you don’t like to speed. These cabs will typically weave in-and-out of traffic, and try to get you to your designation at the fastest (shortest) time possible.

Among the Orange cabs, a few will have the sign “International Taxi” on the crown. These cabs were intended to provide a free-of-charge phone service for interpretation, but their effectiveness for reducing frustration caused by language barriers haven’t been yet 100% percent measured. Services are provided in Korean, English, Chinese (Mandarin) and Japanese.

14-07-19 txi 12

♦ Language Footnote 

  • Deluxe Taxi // 모범택시 // 模範 Taxi
  • Individually Owned Taxi // 개인택시 // 個人 Taxi
  • Company Operated Taxi // 법인택시 // 法人 Taxi
  • Taxi // 택시 (pronounced = Teck-She)

♦ Related Outside Stories and External Links via the World Wide Web ♦

 *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

MY TAKE ON THIS STORYCLICK BELOW TO VOTE
Informative Interesting Uplifting Unbelievable Like Dislike
Proudly powered by WordPress

Korean Movies: 83 of them with English Subtitles

140713krnmovie01

Korean Movies: 83 of them with English Subtitles

140713krnmovie01

The fascinating world of cinema can provide insight into the thoughts, feelings, imagination and values of those who have made and consumed them at theaters nationwide. For foreign made movies, an argument over the ability to indirectly obtain insight into another culture can be made as viewers watch such movies from home (online) and set first experiences (initial encounters) as a beginning point for learning and understanding a completely different culture.

A major problem with watching foreign movies, though, is language. Well, and remarkably, the Korean Film Archive has translated 83 movies for you — all with English sub-titles — and has provided them for public viewing on YouTube. If you have the interest and/or curiosity, you’ll be able to spend days, if not weeks, watching all of these movies which were first release from a period in between the 1950s to 1990s.

♦ Value-Added Insight ♦

[Review and Rating for this YouTube Site] In similar fashion to a restaurant rating, we rate this site (channel) — namely, “KoreanFilm” as being very useful and informative, and give it a two thumbs-up rating.

▶  Click Here to go directly to “Korean Film” videos (83 movies)

To start, a link to the movie called “Love Marriage” in English from 1958 (more than 55 years ago) is provided from YouTube as one “taste” example from the menu of 83. The background of this movie, clothes (a mixture of traditional Korean and western attire), the life-style of a medical doctor’s family from back in the day, and the scenery from the late 1950s of Korea is also quite interesting to see from a learning perspective.

During this period after the Korean War, many young couples were still obliged to wed under a “fixed-by-an-adult-family-members-type-of-arrangement” marriage system; and Korea was transitioning into a society where “dating” before getting married was slowly becoming more socially acceptable as a wedding custom. It is also worth mentioning and intriguing to see that many of the street signs in the capital city of Seoul, 55 years ago, and in the movie had used many more Chinese characters compared with today.

The rating for each one of the movies from this YouTube channel follows the below table.

140713krnmovie03

♦ Food for Thought 

With a sharp increase of cross-cultural and inter-racial marriages on the rise over the past few decades, a window into one aspect of Korean culture — in the form of these theater movies — may provide some help to non-Koreans who wish to further understand his/her spouse and/or their Korean family.

These movies may also indirectly provide assistance to Korean-Americans and/or Korean-Europeans and/or to those who have had at least one parent, or grandparent, that originally came from Korea by adding a rich flavor of both cultural context and content (i.e., frame of reference) toward better understanding them and where — with what type of a background — they’re coming from.

♦ Language Footnote 

  • Love Marriage // 자유결혼 // 自由結婚  (Note: Today the Korean term of “연애결혼” is primarily used. In other words, people no longer use the term 자유결혼)

♦ Related Outside Stories and External Links via the World Wide Web 

♦ More information from YouTube (viewable from desktop and/or notebook) 

Note: The Seoul Tribune takes "copyright and fair use" seriously. As the internet continues on with its evolution, there remain quite a few number of “grey” areas still left open to interpretation. If you have any comments for attention, please send us a message by using this “Contact Us (click here)” form with your opinion so that we may promptly address your concern(s).

 

MY TAKE ON THIS STORYCLICK BELOW TO VOTE
Informative Interesting Uplifting Unbelievable Like Dislike
Proudly powered by WordPress

A Taste of K-POP: I to You, You to Me (Scenery of Riding Bicycle) – Korean movie “The Classic” OST

140620bcycleitoyoutome02

A Taste of K-POP: I to You, You to Me (Scenery of Riding Bicycle) – Korean movie “The Classic” OST

This OST (Original Sound Track) soft rock ballad genre K-POP song was first released in 2003 along with the opening of a Korean movie called “The Classic” (Keulraesik) which debuted on January 30, 2003 – approximately 10 years ago.

The song was sung by a Korean trio male vocal group called the “Scenery seen from riding on top of a Bicycle” which has been shortened to “Scenery of Riding Bicycle” and it is entitled “I am to you what you are to me” which can also be abbreviated to simply “I to You, You to Me”. The singer in the middle, in the above video clip, has a remarkably powerful voice.

The Korean movie — with English subtitles — is provided to you (from YouTube) as an insert below.

♦ Language Footnote 

  • 자전거 탄 풍경 // Scenery from riding on top of a Bicycle // 骑自行车的风景
  • 너에겐 난, 나에게 넌 // I am to you, you are to me // I to You, You to Me
  • 클래식 (Keulraesik) // The Classic

♦ Related Outside Stories and External Links via the World Wide Web 

♦ More information from YouTube (The Classic) 

Note: The Seoul Tribune takes "copyright and fair use" seriously. However, and as the internet continues on with its evolution, there remain quite a few number of “grey” areas still left open to legal interpretation and/or the Republic of Korea court decision cases. If you notice any violation(s) for attention, please send us a message by using this “Contact Us (click here)” form with your opinion so that we may promptly address your concern(s).
MY TAKE ON THIS STORYCLICK BELOW TO VOTE
Informative Interesting Uplifting Unbelievable Like Dislike
Proudly powered by WordPress

A Taste of K-Pop, KARA – Mr. (Mister)

atstofkpopkra03

A Taste of K-Pop, KARA – Mr. (Mister)

atstofkpopkra03

KARA is a K-Pop girl group who had gained tremendous popularity in Japan and elsewhere. Their “2013 Happy New Year” concert held on January 6, 2013 at the Tokyo Dome (Japan) was so immensely popular that all 45,000 tickets were completely sold out within a matter of minutes – reportedly, less than five to be precise.

The names of the original 5 members of this K-Pop group are . . .

  •  Jiyoung (Kang, Ji-Young)
  • Nicole (Jung, Yong-Joo)
  • Gyuri (Park, Gyu-Ri)
  • Seungyeon (Han, Seung-Yeon)
  • Hara (Koo, Ha-Ra)

Currently, the future of KARA is entering into a new phase with 2 of the 5 members leaving the group. Namely, Nicole has returned back the United States and Ji-Young Kang has left to study in the United Kingdom.

Thus, left in the group are Gyuri, Seungyeon and Hara. According to one report, they will be holding their first “fan group meeting” – as a 3 member group – on May 24, 2014.

The video clip below is KARA’s live performance of their hit song “Mister” – with their famous hip dance – at the Tokyo Dome. The studio production of this song has more than 21 million hits / views on YouTube.

♦ Value Added Insight 

The first East Asian act to hit numero uno on the U.S. Billboard Charts was in June 1963 with Japan’s Kyu Sakamoto singing his song Sukiyaki. This was a period when the Tokyo Olympics was going to be soon held (in 1964), and the song symbolically represented Japan’s return to the world stage after its unconditionally surrendered to Allied Forces; and after having been ruled by United States military governors (1945 to 1952).

With KARA as the first Korean Girl Group hitting numero uno on Japan’s Oricon Chart in 2011 with a song called Jet Coaster Love, this first time ever event had also symbolically marked the return of Korea as an exporter of mainstream culture and entertainment to Japan in similar fashion – a position which it hadn’t recently enjoyed in East Asia for many years past.

To the surprise of many Japanese and Koreans alike, the Korean television drama series of Winter Sonata in the year 2002 (12 years ago), starring Yong-Joon Bae and Ji-Woo Choi was also huge hit with many Japanese viewers. Many, within the entertainment industry, view this drama series as the commencement point of the so called Korean Wave in East Asia, Southeast Asia and elsewhere.

♦ Food for Thought 

After Japan’s failed attempted to erase Korea’s culture and language during its occupation of Korea (1910 to 1945), the Republic of Korea’s government — after having regained its independence — outlawed all Japanese movies, drama, songs and cartoons from being aired on radio airwaves and on television sets.

To this date, with very few complaints, there are still many restrictions to prevent the permeation of Japanese culture into Korea. During 2004, the Korean government lifted the ban of sales on CDs, cassette tapes and record album, and opened (with zero restriction) South Korea’s market to Japanese movies.

On the hand, the majority of South Korea’s popular music market during the 1950s, 1960s, 1970s up until the late 1980s were a combination of local Korean songs called Kayo, and the other genre of popular music was (is) called pop-song in Korean which was(is) greatly influenced by U.S. and British artists. Today, more and more people (on a relative scale) are in favor of listening to K-Pop over US/British artists.

If you’re listening to FM radio while visiting Korea today, this is the reason for why you can hear so many old popular songs from America and/or the UK. For decades, the AFKN (Armed Forces Korea Network) channel was openly aired on the public TV airwaves in South Korea using Channel 2. In the past, the broadcasting of AFKN had made american culture very popular to South Korea’s population who were interested in foreign cultures and languages.

Today, and with the freedom of the internet, virtually any culture and/or song is accessible to anyone which is forever creating more avenues for people to appreciate different songs from all cultures and different countries.

♦ More information from YouTube 

♦ Language Footnote 

  • KARA // 카라 // カラ
  • Jiyoung (Kang, Ji-Young) / 강지영
  • Nicole (Jung, Yong-Joo) / 정용주
  • Gyuri (Park, Gyu-Ri) / 박규리
  • Seungyeon (Han, Seung-Yeon) / 한승연
  • Hara (Koo, Ha-Ra) / 구하라
  • Winter Sonata // 겨울연가 // 冬のソナタ
  • Korean Wave or Hallyu // 한류 (韩流 / 韓流)
  • Kayo //  가요 (歌謠)
  • Pop-Song // 팝송
MY TAKE ON THIS STORYCLICK BELOW TO VOTE
Informative Interesting Uplifting Unbelievable Like Dislike
Proudly powered by WordPress

A Taste of K-Pop, CN BLUE – I’m Sorry

140326cnbluekpop1

A Taste of K-Pop, CN BLUE – I’m Sorry

CNBLUE is a South Korean rock band formed in Seoul (2009). CN is an abbreviation of ‘Code Name’ while BLUE is an abbreviation of the members’ individual images. ‘Burning’ represents Jong-Hyun Lee, ‘Lovely’ represents Min-Hyuk Kang, ‘Untouchable’ represents Jung-Shin Lee, and ‘Emotional’ represents Yong-Hwa Jung.

If you haven’t heard any K-Pop songs as of lately, you may be in for a big surprise at sound and quality of this production. As of April 2014, CN Blue’s “I’m Sorry” had chalked-up more than 7.4 million YouTube views. They are an extremely popular group in East Asia, Southeast Asia and Latin America – listen and enjoy!

♦ Language Footnote 

  • CNBLUE = 씨엔블루 (Japanese > シーエヌブルー)

 

MY TAKE ON THIS STORYCLICK BELOW TO VOTE
Informative Interesting Uplifting Unbelievable Like Dislike
Proudly powered by WordPress